Candy Movie Review: The Ronit Roy-Richa Chadha Thriller Is As Thrilling As A Molar Surgery

In Candy, nothing fits in. No one makes sense. Not a word in the dialogues is indicative of any seriousness in the presentation regarding the narcotic habits of youngsters.

3039 Reads |  

Candy Movie Review: The Ronit Roy-Richa Chadha Thriller Is As Thrilling As A Molar Surgery

Wanted: quality control on the digital platform. This despicable drama of drugs and satanism of loss and betrayal (now we’re talking about the audience as well) in a school in a hill station conveniently name Rudrakund (you can’t give a real name to town filled with such disagreeable species of mankind) raises serious questions of how webserials get passed the checkpost.

Or is it a free for all? Looks like it, considering the whodunnit unravels in the last episode with at least three suspects being placed in the dock one after another in a highly jagged relay-race fashion. I could just hear  the screenwriters playing eenie-mini-minee-mo with the suspects.

Candy starts with a young teenage boy’s body impaled to a tree. Don’t let the gruesome beginnings bother you. If you plan to keep on watching (although one has to be a certified masochist to inflict this on oneself) the anxiety to keep viewers’ interests alive grows in inverse proportion to the script’s tenability.

While the script tries to find its way out of the grave it digs itself, we are left watching two talented actors Ronit Bose Roy and Richa Chadha wrestling with the macabre absurdities of the script, and with one another for at least first three episodes, after which they conclude they are both on the same side.

We are happy for their hard-earned solidarity. But there is little they can do to revive a DOA script . Not that the script fails entirely on the concept level. Feeding youngsters highly addictive drugs through  harmless candies (which go by the rather obscene brand name of Lickme candies) could have yielded a gripping cat-and-mouse thriller where a grieving father (Ronit’s character has lost his only daughter to drugs) and a cop with an abusive past (we get flashes of Richa’s character getting bashed up by a brutish husband) get together to save the young from a loutish local politician (Manu Rishi Chadha).

Instead the narrative takes off into tangents, like a belly dancer that has had one too many, slithering and sliding through a maze of murk and mayhem. The series is tacky and indifferently produced. The production reeks of quality cuts. The only actor who tries to make any sense of his role is Ronit Roybose. He plays a father and an educationationst struggling with a personal tragedy and inner demons while trying to cope with distressful and sordid goings-on in the valley of the drolls aka Rudrakund.

Nothing fits in. No one makes sense. Not a word in the dialogues is indicative of any seriousness in the presentation regarding the narcotic habits of youngsters. For all they care, those poor misguided students could suck on sugary coloured sweets all their lives and get high on tacky serials.



Image source: IMDb
Advertisement